The Holy Spirit’s Role in the Life of Christ and Christians

The ordinary often gives way to the sensational and if we’re not careful the ordinary is lost by being overlooked. Take for example the “ordinary” gifts of the Spirit. Who prays diligently for the gift of administration or helping (1 Corinthians 12:28)? Who “earnestly desires” (1 Cor. 12:31) the gifts of service, exhortation, generosity, and acts of mercy (Romans 12:6-8)?

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying you, personally, do not pray for and pursue these gifts but as a whole it has been my experience, both personally and professionally, that if a conversation arises concerning the gifts of the Spirit, tongues, prophecy, healing, and miracles take center stage. Perhaps, and I believe so, this is because they are far more sensation than the ordinary.

Take Luke 4:1-15, the temptation of Jesus, in this same mindset. What may be perceived as ordinary can give way to what may be seen as sensational if we’re not careful. In so doing, we may very well lose sight of one of the most empowering and important aspects of Jesus’ life that is applicable to our own in tremendous measure.

Let me explain:

Three, easily overlooked, ordinary words, describe the extraordinary, some might even say sensational, life of Jesus Christ: “…full…led…power…” (Luke 4:1 & 14; ESV). All three words describe the relationship that Jesus had with the Holy Spirit. Before we evaluate the sensational temptations of Jesus and His perfect victory over sin and Satan, we must understand these three components.

Full:

Jesus was full of the Holy Spirit. This adjective describes the ongoing state of being in which Jesus lived His daily life. He did so, and was so, because He always lived in obedience to the Father. Notice the last place we see Jesus before Luke makes this statement (Luke 3:21-22) is identifying with sinful humanity in John’s baptism of repentance even though He had nothing to repent from or to. Why? Matthew tells us exactly why from Jesus own mouth, “…it is fitting for us to fulfill all righteousness” (Mt. 3:15). No sin meant no need for repentance. No repentance meant no need for baptism…except that this was by the Father’s design that the Second Adam would identify with the First Adam, and all his offspring, that He might become a suitable sacrifice in their (my) stead.

Jesus lived His life full of the Spirit, living with the fulness of the Spirit, because He was always submitted to the will of the Father in active obedience.

Led:

Jesus was led by the Holy Spirit. This verb is the grammatical demonstration of the Divine-Human participation in the carrying out God’s will from those who are full of the Spirit. Both Matthew & Mark give us this account/word in its passive form highlighting that Jesus was “thrust or compelled or driven” into the wilderness. Whereas Luke provides this verb in its active form implying voluntary cooperation “to bring, or to carry.”

I believe an accurate word picture could be describe this way: As the Spirit of God drove the Son of God, Jesus yielded voluntarily and cooperated fully. Being full of the Spirit, Jesus yielded voluntarily and cooperated fully to the Father’s will by Spirit’s leading.

Power:

Jesus lived in the power of the Holy Spirit. Take note of the connection, “And Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit…was led by the Spirit into the wilderness…and Jesus returned in the power of the Spirit…” (Luke 4:1, 14). A life full of the Spirit, being led by the Spirit, will result in living in the power of the Spirit. Where did this power come from? The Spirit. How did Jesus get this power? By a yielded, cooperative, temptation & sin-defeating life through overcoming temptation by the Spirit-inspired Word of God. Jesus wielded spiritual weapons for the spiritual battle (Eph. 6).

Jesus knew God’s Word, God’s plan, God’s Spirit, and never deviated from living for God’s glory.

Christian, we often desire the power of the Spirit. We long for the sensational and overlook the ordinary (especially the ordinary means of grace). A life not full of the Spirit will never be led by the Spirit and will never live in the power of the Spirit.

Perhaps, Satan’s temptation is not “the sensational” in this account. Perhaps, the defeat of Satan and his cunning deceit is the ordinary result of a life completely, and sensationally, surrendered to the Spirit of God. I believe it is. I know I’ve not yet come to live in this state of being, but praise God He’s brought me closer today than five years ago. And I believe five years from now I will be even closer still as the Vinedresser continues to prune me that I might bear more fruit.

I am confident of this: That He who began this good work in me will bring it to completion (Philippians 1:6). Oh Father, fill me your Spirit that I might follow His leading and live in His power, to the praise of your glory!

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