The Top Ten

Is it ever possible to read too many books (or have too many books)? I do not think so! It was a blessing to read some wonderful, stirring, challenging, and invigorating books this past year. Here are the ten books I read in 2019 that would be my top recommendations for you to pick up and dive into in 2020!

10) “Still Protesting” by D.G. Hart

When confusion still exists as to whether the Protestant Reformation is still going on and needed, Hart provides a compelling case as to why the divine between Protestants and Rome still exists. Furthermore, Hart deals with some of the main arguments that individuals make as to why they embrace the theology of Rome. We need to be aware of why we are Protestant and why it still matters in the 21st century.

9) “Favor: Finding Life at the Center of God’s Affection” by Greg Gilbert

Many Christians seem to think that they must do things in order to maintain or keep the favor of God. Why do I have bad things happen to me if I am faithful to read my Bible and pray in the morning? Gilbert offers much needed encouragement for weary saints. In showing the favor we have in Christ is unchanging, this book will seek to reorient how we view our lives.

8) “Made for His Pleasure” by Alistair Begg

We walked through this book on Wednesday evenings as a church. This book deals with ten benchmarks for the Christian to look at in our lives. Begg weaves personal stories and doctrinal truths that make this a compelling read that would work well for a small group or church study.

7) “Here I Stand” by Roland Bainton

If you ever look at biographies of Martin Luther, Bainton’s book usually ranks high on the list. This book does live up to the hype! Bainton does a wonderful job of painting visuals of what took place in Luther’s life. You will feel like you are walking through the streets with the German Reformer!

6) “Being a Pastor: A Conversation with Andrew Fuller” by Haykin and Croft

This short volume is a must read in the area of pastoral theology. Haykin and Croft provide historical context and practical application with the thrust of the book being a collection of ordination sermons Andrew Fuller preached. This is a great introductory book if you have never read Fuller. As a pastor, his sermons challenged me and stirred me to gaze at Christ continually.

5) “True Bounds of Christian Freedom” by Samuel Bolton

In a time where this is so much confusion on the law and the gospel, this Puritan paperback provides so much clarity and guidance in how we understand law and gospel. Bolton shows how the law functions in the life of an unbeliever and a believer. This classic Reformed book should be read by all!

4) “Communion with God” by John Owen

There are times when John Owen is a hard read. However, the Puritan paperback edition of this classic will feed your souls. Owen walks through how the Christian possesses communion with the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. The riches of our Trinitarian salvation are often overlooked. Owen will show you how this is the foundation of all our hope and peace.

3) “From Shadow to Substance” by Sam Renihan

This is the first book from Renihan that I would recommend. In this book, he traces out the historical development of Particular Baptist covenant (or federal theology). As Renihan demonstrates, the Baptists were a part of a diverse Reformed community when it came to covenant theology. They did not stand alone but used the theological principles of men like John Cameron and John Owen to develop what is now called 1689 Federalism. This book sheds light on the historical theology of the first Particular Baptists.

2) “The Mystery of Christ” by Sam Renihan

Renihan provides a biblical study and overview for a comprehensive understand of biblical covenants from a 1689 Baptist standpoint. Renihan’s treatment of the Abrahamic and Mosaic covenants is especially helpful in seeing some of the differences between Presbyterians and Baptists. This is not a polemical work but seeks to present a positive case for the Baptist view. Renihan does a masterful job and it is a must read to understand the Baptist view.

1) “Reformed Preaching” by Joel Beeke

Sinclair Ferguson was correct when he said you would need a lot of highlighters as you read this book because of how much you will mark! If I were teaching a homiletics class, this would be one of the required text books. Beeke provides a balanced approach of strengths in Reformed preaching while giving attention to blind spots that develop in the tradition. Utilizing historical examples, offering nuggets of practical application, and being an easy read, every preacher should pick this book up and read this year! Beeke will sharpen your preaching!

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