The Preacher’s Motives

Mondays are the one day of the week many in the secular world lament, because it means an end to the weekend and the beginning of another long work week. Ironically, I’ve talked to several pastors over the years who have shared that Mondays are their least favorite too, but for different reasons. I think these pastors dislike Mondays because of how Sunday turned out. In fact, I’ve heard older pastors advise me never to quit the ministry on a Monday because of this, and yet that is the one day pastors often feel the most discouraged.

So there I was feeling discouraged going into the next Monday morning and wanting to leave the ministry. I’d prayed, prepared, and preached my heart out only to feel like all my efforts were wasted. Then I read this by D.A. Carson and it pinned me to the wall:

“That is the ultimate test: it is the test of our motives. Some of us pursue what is excellent, even in the spiritual arena, simply because we find it hard to do anything else. Our perfectionist natures are upset when there is inferior discipline, inferior preaching, inferior witness, inferior praying, inferior teaching. If we are concerned over these things because we sense in them a church that has sunk into contentment with lukewarmness and spiritual mediocrity, if we try to change these things because in our heart of hearts we are zealous for the glory of Christ and the good of his people, that is one thing; if, however, our concern over these matters is driven primarily by our own high, perfectionist standards, we will be less inclined to help, and more inclined to belittle. Our own service will become a source of secret pride, precisely because it is more competent than much of what we see around us. And sadly, much of this ostensible concern for quality may be nothing more than self-worship, the ugliest idolatry of them all.”

I had been assuming that my discouragement and disillusionment with ministry was well-reasoned and pure. However, it was owing more to my own love of self than it was the glory of Christ and the good of my flock. Hidden beneath the surface was this internal motive that was truly deceptive and dangerous. So the takeaway for us preachers and teachers is that we must consistently check our motives before, during, and after the preaching/teaching event and stop assuming they are altogether pure. Sure your sermon may have been one huge 45 minute dud, but are you more concerned with a polished delivery or strengthening your weary flock? So maybe your congregation seems unmoved and unmotivated, but are you more frustrated at the weeds present or more thankful at the small buds of life that are sprouting up? One pastor friend of mine gave me a helpful piece of advice I’ve never forgotten from his own painful experience: “We aren’t called to beat the goats. We’ve been called to feed the sheep.” If you aren’t a preacher or teacher, jot down some ways you have grown spiritually under your pastor or Sunday school teacher’s ministry and write them a thank you note detailing this or tell them about it this Sunday. This Sunday a member approached me and just mentioned one thing they learned from a sermon I’d considered a dud that really helped them. This was so encouraging. Another two mentioned that they were reading their Bibles more than they ever have lately…smalls signs of God’s hand at work, yet huge encouragements to the one delivering God’s Word each week. They may appear to be fueled by proper motives, but you’d be surprised to discover they may be wanting to quit because they see their efforts as wasted. Satan has a fine way of inserting lies between the one speaking for God and the ones they are addressing. Go to war with his subtle tricks for the good of your church and the ministry of God’s Word as it goes forth week by week.

May the Lord help us all to have pure motives as we expound the glories of Christ through the preaching of God’s Word this Sunday.

ENDNOTES
  1. D.A. Carson, Praying with Paul: A Call to Spiritual Reformation, (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2014), 119.

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