Book Review: Zeal Without Burnout by Christopher Ash

If you have served in ministry, whether that is on the pastoral end or the nursery, you may have felt at time like Bilbo Baggins: “I feel thin, sort of stretched, like butter scraped over too much bread.” You have felt bogged down through a season, felt a little off every day, or just unseasonable irritable. These are some of the early warning signs of burnout, something that has become a more common occurrence in the church. That is why this little book (123 pgs) by Christopher is so important to the life of the church. In this book Ash begins to lay out for us some warning signs to look for and some ways in which we can be restored and revived in the midst of a hard season of life and ministry.

First, this book is not an academic study into the ins and outs of the physiological nature of burnout, rather it is a personal look at the lives that have been affected by burnout and how they got there. It takes us through the lives of different ministry leaders and works to reveal some of the warning signs that were missed and how they recovered after they stepped back and took stock of what was going on in their lives. Ash’s use of testimonials help to ground us in the reality of what he is talking about, and in some cases you may see your self reflected in them. Like Carrie who was a youth ministry worker who put in almost 14 hours a day in different youth related ministry activities until one day it began to physically break her body down, and she had to step back and look at what she was doing. She loved every aspect of what she was doing; the job was everything she ever wanted and she loved the impact she had on young women, but it took a hidden toll that she hadn’t calculated.[i]

Second, these testimonies are connected directly with practical and biblical advice on serving the Lord without losing your mind. Ash lays out for us 7 key principles that we need to be reminded of as we do lifelong ministry.

  1. We need sleep, God does not
  2. We need Sabbath Rest, God does not
  3. We need friends, God does not
  4. We need inward renewal, God does not

These opening four keys  remind us that we are human and not God and need to stop trying to be God and let him do His work. These are especially helpful as they remind us that in the work of the ministry there will always be more to do, but that in the end it is God who controls the means and way in which the work is to be done and that is through rest and faith in him and growing in fruitful communities that refresh and encourage our walks with God, not our busyness for Him.

The final three Keys force us to look at how we perceive our ministry and what our true goals are.

  1. We are warned not to seek Glory from man, but only that which comes from God
  2. An encouragement that the work is worth the sacrifice (not the burnout)
  3. Rejoice in the grace god has given to you not your giftedness

These three final bullets strike to the heart with what can begin to take root and bury us under our own ideals and pursuits. Sometimes we see our ministry through the giftedness God has given us, or the number of people being affected by our work, we forget that the reason we are sustained in ministry is that if all that were to fall away we would still be God’s children. His concluding focus on our nature as God’s and not our own was a healthy reminder to all of us that through the good and through the bad of ministry we are God’s, our identity in Him is the foundation of how we are to minister and how we are to move through the stress of sacrificial ministry.

Highly recommend this book to anyone struggling through ministry, or who are just starting out and what to run the race well.

Purchase: WTSBooks or Amazon

 

[i] Ash, Christopher. Zeal without Burnout: Seven Keys to a Lifelong Ministry of Sustainable Sacrifice. The Good Book Company, 2016.  Pg 54-55

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Live in the Gospel!

1 Peter 3:13-22

13 Now who is there to harm you if you are zealous for what is good? 14 But even if you should suffer for righteousness’ sake, you will be blessed. Have no fear of them, nor be troubled, 15 but in your hearts honor Christ the Lord as holy, always being prepared to make a defense to anyone who asks you for a reason for the hope that is in you; yet do it with gentleness and respect, 16 having a good conscience, so that, when you are slandered, those who revile your good behavior in Christ may be put to shame. 17 For it is better to suffer for doing good, if that should be God’s will, than for doing evil.
18 For Christ also suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unrighteous, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh but made alive in the spirit, 19 in which he went and proclaimed to the spirits in prison, 20 because they formerly did not obey, when God’s patience waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was being prepared, in which a few, that is, eight persons, were brought safely through water. 21 Baptism, which corresponds to this, now saves you, not as a removal of dirt from the body but as an appeal to God for a good conscience, through the resurrection of Jesus Christ, 22 who has gone into heaven and is at the right hand of God, with angels, authorities, and powers having been subjected to him.

Why is the victorious resurrection of Jesus so important to our everyday lives? Have you ever asked yourself that question? When you step back and think about the totality of the gospel; is it simply something that was applied once to your life and then moved away from or is it something you see as integral to your everyday experience of life? For Peter it was the later, and in conclusion to the 3rd chapter of his epistle he makes it clear that the power of Christ’s resurrection should be the power and motivation for which we stand, speak, and live.

So to begin with this is not an easy passage in any way but the message it paints is quite remarkable, for in this we see Peter begin to wrap up his discussion on all the ways that as Christians we are to be subject to the authorities that are around us, even when that may lead to distress or suffering. Peter paints for us this concluding picture that the experiences of this temporal life are a means of experiencing the final victory in Christ, so the adversity that we experience here on earth is but momentary, and compared to the glory of the victorious Christ they have no eternal  effect on your soul. So Peter wants us to see that with the knowledge of the resurrection, the suffering of this world should be met with a spirit who is set on Christ, with words that proclaim the gift that he has given us and actions that reflect the forgiven life we now possess.

So firstly we see that when we come to the realization that this world cannot truly harm us in a spiritual sense, for we have been granted life and safety in the arms of our Father, our very nature is transformed. We begin to believe and echo the words of Isaiah 8:12 no longer fearing the things of this world but honoring Christ as supreme and the only one worthy of our fear. In this we see that we don’t need to fear the things this world fears like sickness, suffering, injustice, pain, or even death for in Christ’s victory all these things are swallowed up and no longer have a hold on our hearts. We now operate under the knowledge that our hope and security is in Christ, so when these things occur around us we can stand knowing that God has our back and in doing so the world will wonder how we endure, and when the world wonders and asks we must give a response for that hope. What is amazing to remember is the command to be prepared to give a defense wasn’t given to theological scholars or the most educated it was given to the early church which was made of a broad range of people, but as seen in the previous chapter was made up of some of the most beaten down by society. It is to this church that the command was given to know why you endure and share that hopeful gift with others.

This hope also leads to a second lesson we see. That our actions in the midst of adversity affect the perception of the truth of the gospel we proclaim. We are to proclaim the truth of Christ to all who ask in a spirit of gentleness and respect. In this we see the motivation behind the command, we exemplify Christ when we give an answer to the faith, and especially should the question arise out of suffering or injustice. So what we say and what we do should line up with the reality of the identity we have as sojourners and strangers. Our lives should reflect our citizenship in heaven and our heavenly Father who called us out of the darkness and gave us hope, when hope was gone. In this way we reflect the gift of Christ to those around us, for blessed are those who suffer for righteousness sake, but should the pain you experience in life be the product of our own sinfulness than that too is an opportunity to show what it means to repent and be restored in the family of God and in doing so show and unbelieving world what it means to experience forgiveness and grace and be transformed by it not excused by it.

Finally why can we do this: because Christ suffered and died for our sins, resurrecting on the third day. He didn’t have to, for he was the righteous one of God, and yet for our unrighteousness He took on the cross bearing the full wrath of the Father and in doing so made a way for us to be reconciled to God anew.  The text though doesn’t end there and while the conclusion may be complicated in its parts the picture as a whole is painted to show us that the trials of this life are nothing because Christ is victorious over them. In his death & resurrection He proclaimed victory over the spiritual forces who thought that they had power greater than His. In His death and resurrection we have passed through the wrath of God, through faith and baptism, for we have been placed into Christ who has absorbed the waves of God’s judgment keeping us secure, those whose faith is in Him, and in doing so He claimed victory.

 

Gospel Fueled Change

In Peter’s first letter he spends a great deal of time setting down the foundation for why we as believers should live holy lives. He reminds the church of the need to grow up in the faith and not become stagnant. In the first ten verses of chapter two he helps reorient our focus to the reality of who we are and our relationship to Christ and one another. A couple weeks ago I walked us briefly through some of the direct application of living out the faith as sojourners in a land that is not our home, and how our lives should look different than those around us, and more importantly than our old lives. Today I want to briefly reminds us of the foundation of our Hope and the cause of our changed lives that comes only through the power of the Gospel not through human effort.

So put away all malice and all deceit and hypocrisy and envy and all slander. Like newborn infants, long for the pure spiritual milk, that by it you may grow up into salvation— if indeed you have tasted that the Lord is good

Peter opens with the reality that our lives are now marked by a change in desire. No longer do we desire the things of the world or do we mirror the attitudes of those around us, rather we desire the pure spiritual milk of God’s word. This is seen in the concluding passage of 1 Peter 1:25 where Peter reminds us that the gospel has set us free from sin and death and gave us the hope we have today. It is from this driving force that the desire to put away all malice and long for the joy of God’s word springs. From the Gospel hope we are now called to put away the old life with all of its vices and anger and strive hard after God, for it is only from growing in the faith that these things are possible. We know that healthy and physically maturing people don’t indulge constantly on Doritos and hot dogs, when someone sets it in their minds to grow healthy they long towards the things that will bring that to fruition, like a healthy diet and exercise. The same is true of spiritual life; we cannot indulge on the things of the flesh and expect that growth and maturity will simply take place. We are called through Christ’s power to yearn for the hope that brings spiritual maturity, the true spiritual milk.

For If you have tasted the joy of the Lord and savored His goodness why would you want anything else. Sometimes it seems we need to be reminded how good God is and how appetizing the Gospel’s message is to our soul. If you have tasted the goodness of God, like a nice porterhouse steak, (or some eggplant type dish thing vegans must enjoy), then you know how satisfying He is. How He fills your stomach with life and hope everlasting. Peter is then asking us the question why aren’t you longing for that every day. Why do you keep running back to the attitudes and hostilities of the world that will leave you empty and starving. If the Gospel has taken root, then eat the only thing hat will truly satisfy and grow you into maturity, Jesus Christ & His word.

As you come to him, a living stone rejected by men but in the sight of God chosen and precious, you yourselves like living stones are being built up as a spiritual house, to be a holy priesthood, to offer spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God through Jesus Christ. For it stands in Scripture: “Behold, I am laying in Zion a stone, a cornerstone chosen and precious, and whoever believes in him will not be put to shame.” So the honor is for you who believe, but for those who do not believe, “The stone that the builders rejected has become the cornerstone,” and “A stone of stumbling, and a rock of offense.” They stumble because they disobey the word, as they were destined to do.

Once we have evaluated our desires, we are asked by Peter to see ourselves through the lenses of Christ. Here Peter is encouraging us to see our growth in maturity in light of the fact that we are like Christ. He was the true living stone rejected by humanity, so too are we living stones who are rejected by humanity. The world rejected Jesus and we should not be surprised that it will reject those who look like Him. Therefore we should not be shocked when the world rejects us, but rather we should see all the more clearly that we are not alone in being rejected. Rather, we are a part of a living temple being built together, into Christ. The rejection of the world should build our spiritual unity as believers, and as our unity of spirit grows so too does our witness, and as we mature in Christ we will continue to turn our hearts over to him, preparing our minds for action and seeking to live our lives in a manner that seeks to glorify God and not our flesh.

 But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for his own possession, that you may proclaim the excellencies of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light. 10 Once you were not a people, but now you are God’s people; once you had not received mercy, but now you have received mercy. 11 Beloved, I urge you as sojourners and exiles to abstain from the passions of the flesh, which wage war against your soul. 12 Keep your conduct among the Gentiles honorable, so that when they speak against you as evildoers, they may see your good deeds and glorify God on the day of visitation.

Finally, we are grounded in the reality that we have a new identity as heirs with Christ. Just as you grew up physically and learned about who you were and where you came from, so too as we grow into Christ we learn who we are in Him and what that means for us.  We learn more and more about our identity and the family that we now have been given. We also begin to see that within our new family we have been given a new occupation as priests proclaiming the greatness of God who set us free from our own sinfulness. As such we call others to experience the greatness of our God who has changed us and given us a lasting home in his presence. We proclaim to the world the mercy of God, the hope of heaven, the living stone rejected by the men.

We have been Chosen, we have been set apart, we have been made Holy, and we have been given a home. These things were given to us we never earned them nor could we. God in his infinite grace bestowed them on those whom He called out of darkness and who through His grace have called upon the name of His Son. Before you can begin to evaluate how you are able to living in a dying and sinful word, you must first remember and know that you are His and that all that you are is found in Him. Before Peter begins a long discussion on living out the faith in a world that will mock, ridicule, and at times persecuted you, you have to know who you are and whose you are, so that you may live out the faith in response to this good news and in a way that reveals it to others.

 

Let’s DO this!

1 Peter 2:11-12

Beloved, I urge you as sojourners and exiles to abstain from the passions of the flesh, which wage war against your soul. Keep your conduct among the Gentiles honorable, so that when they speak against you as evildoers, they may see your good deeds and glorify God on the day of visitation.

Peter and James are two of the most holy driven books in the new testament, by this I mean that both men encourage believers to live out their faith with boldness and with a perspective that what they do matters, not just to God but to those around them. Now we would be foolish though to think that these calls to Holiness and Righteous lives are devoid of any Spiritual understanding. Rather both James and Peter root their calls for Holiness in the truth of Christ and the reality of our new birth through Him. Today I want to briefly remind us of Peter’s encouragement to us as to why and how we live out the faith in Holiness.

First Peter reminds us that we sojourners and exiles. The importance in this reminder is that he uses a combination of these two words in a way that harkens the reader backwards into biblical history. It connects us to another important figure who spent his life living among people that were not his own, as one called out and set apart for a new life, a life filled with promises that would not be fully realized in his own time. That man was Abraham. In reminding us of Abraham’s own words we are reminded of how God provided for Him and loved Him. We are reminded of a man, who though he made mistakes, was never forgotten by God or lost sight of the promised future. God’s promises to Abraham were fulfilled, and so too will the promises made to us God’s children. We are being transformed into the image of the living God and as such he will now encourage us to live in light of that reality.

Not only does this reminder connect us back to the blessing and provision of God towards Abraham, but also the reality that He was a man called out and chosen by God, just as we are. In the opening chapter of Peter’s Epistle he continually reinforces the truth that we are called to the new life we live. We are not here by accident, and nothing that occurs to us or around us is a mistake or accident. God has called us into a new and lasting Kingdom, and as such He has given us the blessing of knowing that our future is assured and our life is His. When we begin to realize that our lives are secure in Christ and that He has set us free from the burdens of the world we can then better appreciate the call He gives us to be Holy as God is Holy.

So then secondly, we are now being greatly urged to abstain from the passion of the flesh. Again because we are a new creation and God has given us new life in the life and death of Christ, our lives will be different. Our lives are no longer simply a passive experience, but rather a battle against the forces of this world and our own innate passions. Scripture gives us several examples of passions we do battle with:

1 Peter 2:1 So put away all malice and all deceit and hypocrisy and envy and all slander.

1 Peter 4:3 For the time that is past suffices for doing what the Gentiles want to do, living in sensuality, passions, drunkenness, orgies, drinking parties, and lawless idolatry.

Gal 5:19-21  Now the works of the flesh are evident: sexual immorality, impurity, sensuality, 20 idolatry, sorcery, enmity, strife, jealousy, fits of anger, rivalries, dissensions, divisions, 21 envy, drunkenness, orgies, and things like these. I warn you, as I warned you before, that those who do such things will not inherit the kingdom of God.

These are but an overarching theme of what Peter is encouraging us to remember: if we are beloved by God and growing in the faith these will be the things that will try to creep in and destroy that faith, but as believers in Christ we can overcome. Paul reminded the Corinthian believers that there are no temptations in this life that cannot be overcome through Christ. The call to abstain from the passion of the flesh is not an impossible one, but it is one that requires us to be mindful of our choices and to think more clearly about each step we take. We live our lives in an active state before a watching world, as such we are also called to maintain Good Conduct.

Peter encourages the believers over the reminder of Chapter 2 and into chapter 3 to ensure that the way they act and live isn’t simply free from the passions of the flesh, but that it is active in its obedience to Christ and the maintaining of good conduct around those who would question the faith or even seek to destroy it. Peters words remind us of Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount (Matt 5:14-16)  “You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden.  Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house.  In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven.

So the Christian life is more than simply abstaining from sin, it is a willful pursuit of Christ that leads to a maintaining of good conduct. It is becoming Holy as He is Holy. 

However, what is so interesting about this passage is how Peter connects our desire to follow God in righteousness with the proclamation of the Gospel. Peter encourages us to live in righteousness that the world and those who would stand against us would see the Jesus, and as such create an opportunity to come to faith. Here our way of life is a representation of God to the people. Every word we say, every action we take, everything thing we post online, is a representation of Christ to the World, and a declaration of who He is and how He has changed us. Our lives should show that we are different from the world not a nicer dressed version of it. Our conduct should show them more and more of the true life found in Christ, not a false faith of our own making.

The Publican’s Conference 2017

With our second annual conference just a day away we wanted to take a moment and just give everyone an update on what to expect and how excited we are for tomorrow.

First, this years conference will feature several pastors from around the bay area as well as contributors from Georgia. Each of the men speaking this week labors inside a local church week in and week out and will be speaking from the heart of a pastor to all who attend. This is a great opportunity to see the church in a fuller sense, beyond the four walls we individually call home, along with hearing from some great men of God who love the Lord and His saints. The Publican’s conference Tomorrow, will attest to the glory of the reformation as it continues today. However, we no longer allow some doctrinal distinctions in our reformed camps to force us to stand apart, but rather as one we proclaim the glory of God, the centrality of Christ, the truth of Scripture, the need of faith, and the blessed work of Grace in our lives.

Second, we will be celebrating one of the key events in the history of the church, and why this event, and its aftermath, should not be forgotten from the Christian church today. Recent studies and surveys show that more than half of evangelicals could not identify who Martin Luther was or why he was important to the church. As the Church drifts more and more into the “me” centered , moment by moment experience for living, we lose sight of the those who labored for the gospel and how their lives have directly changed our own. We study great men in the history of the church, not to venerate them as some kind of untouchable saint, but to appreciate the work they did laboring over the Word of God and calling all men and women to do the same. We know that every player in the reformation was not without error or perfect. Their doctrines in many cases didn’t line up perfectly, nor did they even seem to fully like each other, but their call to return to Scripture is the hallmark of the Church today, and the overall focus of what you can expect tomorrow.

I can’t wait to see many of you with us tomorrow. Also you don’t’ want to miss out on the opportunity to possibly get some book in our annual giveaway.

Doors open at 8, and the conference will kick off at 9.

9:10 – Session 1: Andrew Jaenichen: The Hammer Heard Round the World: The Events that Led to the Reformation

9:55 – Session 2: Aaron Currin: The Great Recovery: Justification by Faith Alone

10:40 – Session 3: Matt Noble: Who’s Our Priest? The Pope & Jesus Christ

11:25 – Morning book giveaways

11:30 – Break for Lunch

AFTERNOON

12:40 – Session 4: Adam Powers: A Celestial Theater of Grace: Calvin On Corporate Worship

1:25 – Session 5: Austin Wynn: The Legacy of the Reformation, Christ Will Build His Church

2:10 – Session 6: Tanner Cline: Always Reforming: Where Do We Go From Here?

2:50 – Afternoon book giveaways

3:00 – Closing Song: A Mighty Fortress

Location: Riverside Baptist Church, 6219 River Road, New Port Richey, FL 34652

Peter and the Life of a Sojourner

In the Book of First Peter the apostle deals with the overarching idea of finding meaning in the Christian life,especially in the reality of being called to live out this life as Sojourners. In the first chapter of the Book he lays the ground work by grounding the reader in the fact that we have a special identity, one that was given to us by God at our new birth. This new identity entails not just a new home, but a new way of life. A life no longer grounded in the passions of the flesh leading to destruction but one grounded in the pursuit of the Lord.

In the middle of the first chapter (13-21) Peter begins to lay out a series of exhortations for how we are to be prepared to live out the Christian life. Each one of these exhortations helps us to see the way forward in living out the christian life especially in a world that is broken by sin. 1) Our Hope must be fully set on the Grace of God, 2) we are called to pursue holiness as a part of the journey, 3) we must remember that the Grace of God didn’t come cheaply, and 4) we do not travel alone.

Our Hope

To truly understand and experience the Grace of God we are called to place our full Hope in it, not a wishful hope but a fully ground and expectant hope. We do this by preparing ourselves for action. The Christian life is not a passive life but an active one. It sees the world for what it truly is and is prepared to endure trials and tribulations knowing that in it righteousness is grown and others come to faith. So we cannot be indulging in the worlds passions and at the same time be prepared for the assault that comes, nor as the text reminds us can we become intoxicated by the world and lose sight of the home for which we journey. To have your hope fully secured in the Grace of God is to be ready for action and sober of mind.

Holiness of God

It is only from a state of hope that we can truly understand what it means to love God and experience the abiding joy that obedience will bring. Therefore, with our minds sober and ready for action we can now clearly understand Peter’s words as he calls us to live out our lives in Holiness. This holiness is connected to the fact that we are the Children of God and as such we mirror Him to the world around us, just as we are images of your earthly parents and all those who have born our names in this world. We are His children who have been reborn out of the ignorance of the world. He has given us new minds and a new heart so that we may live out the faith in holiness, grounded in the grace of God. The call to holiness is a call to forgive and be forgiven, it’s a call to walk in the knowledge of God not the ignorance of the World, and it is hope not despair.

We as believers are being called into a new life reflecting on the grace of God and committed to the holiness that it produces in us. Too often this is where we begin to go sideways, We somehow think the Holiness of God is something we now produce, but in the text it is a result of the new birth. It is who you are. Therefore we are called to walk according to the character we now posses and stop living like who we were. We are the Children of the Living God, and with our Hope firmly secured in the grace of Christ we know we are Holy before God, therefore let us walk in holiness before the world, that they may Know the God we serve.

The Cost of Holy Grace

So why do we set our hope in the grace of God and live our lives in Holiness, because we have been purchased by the Blood of Christ. Peter Reminds us once again that it was the Blood of Christ given without respect for persons that set us free. We were bought not with money, but with blood, but not just any blood. We were paid for by the blood of the living God, who judges impartially and who loves us as well. So with a holy and hopeful fear we are called to live out the Gospel hope, knowing that it is He who has set us free, and it is to Him who we live our lives; no longer seeking the pleasures of this world, but living for the life to come as Chosen Sojourners, who by resting in the grace of God that paid for our sins are able to walk in Holiness, being always prepared for the trials that will come, knowing fully that it is God who sustains us.

Does the Nashville Statement matter?

Over the last few weeks within Christian circles a new document was posted online and began to be circulated and talked about on blog posts among pastors and other students of theology. Many big named pastors and scholars signed there names to it and have decreed it almost an anathema not to sign. With such strong endorsements and even partial condemnations against those who are reluctant to sign (many for very biblical and spiritual reasons) this document seems to be one of the most important reflections of Christian orthodoxy, exploring the depths of Scripture to come up with a true reflection of the state of who God is and a defense of orthodoxy, right?

Unfortunately, No.

Now today I don’t wish to bash this statement. It is on its face value a solid statement, dealing with human sexuality and the position of the church. However I would like to ask some questions about it.

First the teaching here is not new so is not necessary.

The Baptist Faith and message deals with these topics to a fair enough degree and is the standard for Southern Baptist Churches. The Westminster standards, the set rule of guidance for theology in conservative Presbyterian church, also address these issues to a degree and both these guiding documents root their discussion and application within Scripture. Throughout history we have guiding documents like these written by great men who in studying the Scriptures point us to these very truths from the Word of God, so that we may study the text they derived their theology from and see for ourselves the nature of their decisions. The Nashville Statement itself bears no Scriptural markers (in that there is neither proof text nor discussion to aid in its application).

Second on whose authority are we submitting to in signing this document?

With the last two references above we see standards of theology that are accepted in two of the major conservative portions of the evangelical world: Southern Baptists and conservative Presbyterians, and many of those baptist churches may even submit to the second London or even New Hampshire confessions. In either case, by submitting to those guiding documents of faith and practice, we place ourselves under their authority in so much as they point us to Scripture and to a proper understanding of God as revealed. These documents address these issues at least in principle as part of a robust theology, not a 14 point over arching rule. The Baptist Faith and Message and the Westminster standards were labored over by appointed and trusted leaders to study the Scripture and speak on behalf of their respected churches. As much as I respect a lot of the men and women who are apart of the CBMW they are a para church organization, with no theological authority or need to answer to anyone, as was seen in the debate over the ESS. It would be as if the Publicans posted a statement of faith and other evangelicals demanded that you sign it to be a true orthodox Christian. As much as I love these guys and trust them, we have churches and Elders who job that is at its core.

Third who is this statement for, the church or the world?

While reading the statement I was struck by the question “Who are they writing to in this statement?” When the Chicago statement on inerrancy came out in the early 20th century it was part of an extremely long debate within the church about the Bible and its authority. It was a discussion of what it meant to be part of the church, and it was intended to be a standard about how the Bible speaks of itself and how we respond to it. However with the Nashville Statement I am no so sure as to its audience. Is this written for the church to examine its members and deal with theses issues as sin that needs to be dealt with like Paul did with the sexual Immorality in Corinth (1 Cor. 5). If that is the case then again this seems a bit out of place in its direction as historically orthodox churches will continue to repudiate these things, in so far as repentance is lacking, within the church. Or is this for the world to be reminded once again they are sinful, at which point I would also appeal to Paul in 1 Corinthians 5 who tells us that he doesn’t attack the world for their sin, because God has already done so, and they know it. Is this just another way for us as Christians to keep seeing other people as no longer made in the image of God and in need of a savior. Everyone needs Jesus the only one who changes souls not us continually making them seem less than human. We all walked according to the desire of the flesh before we knew God, let us not forget that. This final point is why I am most concerned about who the audience is for this statement. The final three points seem to be reminders of the need of the Gospel for salvation rather than a reminder to believers of their identity in Christ and the hope that the gospel grounds them in a reality that is already theirs in Christ.

Now again as I said the substance of the statement is fine at face value, but as with anything that comes out claiming to speak for all of Conservative Christendom we must be discerning and question, not to cause problems but to understand, and a website that opens to a giant ‘Sign Here’ button above the statement rather than after, also tends to lend itself to a bit of a pause as to the full nature and purpose for this new document. At the end of the day whether you sign it or not, I hope your congregations and brothers and sisters in Christ know where you stand on the truth of the Gospel and the reality that sexual immorality in the church needs to be dealt with pastorally. As pastors we deal with real people everyday whose lives matter and who struggle with sinful lust and desires. We experience life with people who need to be told the truth of Scripture and pointed to the cross and their identity in Him. Let us be Ministers of the Gospel.

So whatever you do let your life in Christ be an example of Holiness and repentance. Let your words echo the gospel and orthodoxy, and as such look for the same in your fellow ministers who labor alongside you calling men and women to repentance and a life of faith in the salvific work of Christ.

Are you a Sojourner?

For most of us we may hear the word Sojourner and think about taking a long journey or maybe back-packing around Europe like a well off 20 something with lots of time on their hands, but in reality the idea of being a sojourner is one that strikes at the heart of the Christian faith. When we look around us each day and see the lives that we have built: our cars, our houses, our children, our friends, our family it is very easy to fall into the trap that this is what really matters. That this is our home, and that this is what we are striving to attain. However, biblically speaking, for those who are in Christ this is the furthest from reality, for those who are in Christ where we lay our heads down every night is not our home, but a temporary settlement. 

So today let us look at some facets of this reality that we must remember about the fact that we are sojourners in this life.

Our Citizenship is not of this world

Our lives are  on a journey from this Life to the next, but we are not traveling to a new kingdom or awaiting a change from national identities to our spiritual Christian identities.  We already have been changed. Our citizenship and eternal concerns are not with the decisions made here and now in these earthly kingdoms but with what is being done for the eternal kingdom. Too often the Christian Church seems more concerned with gaining political or temporary authority in this world, then with seeing lives transformed and shaped by the gospel, an event that has eternal rewards rather than the temporary gains of the kingdoms of this world.

We must remember that we serve an eternal kingdom that will not end, and kingdom that cannot be overthrown by any military force or weapon. Should the greatest armies of the world rise up against Christ and His bride their destruction is assured, for His Kingdom has no end. That is the Kingdom we belong too. Once there were citizens of Rome, no longer, there existed the great citizens of Constantinople the pinnacle of art and wealth, no longer, there once was a day where to live in almost any corner of the world you would find citizens of the British crown, no longer, the citizenships and kingdoms of this world are in flux, you may move tomorrow to New Zealand and find it so overwhelming amazing that you take up citizenship there forsaking your previous home. But our citizenship is not so fickle; our citizenship belongs to an eternal Kingdom, and includes believers from all generations who once sojourned in the countries and cities that now lie in waste. We don’t belong to the temporary establishments of this world, but to an eternal kingdom which changes who we are fundamentally.

Our Mission is not the World’s Mission

With the mission of God being so antithetical to the world it makes complete sense than that His children would share the same mission and engage in the same discipline. In the book of 1 Peter this is the essential theme that Peter wishes to strike with his audience that our mission is not of this world, nor is our mission a matter of happenstance. Peter opens by pointing out the reality that we have been called out by God for this mission, we are elect sojourners, and we are people who have our hope set on the Father, being sanctified by the Holy Spirit, with full assurance in Christ’s blood which moves us towards obedience. This is an important thing to see that you didn’t stumble into your citizenship, this is not a mistake, you have been chosen and called to a new life, a new mission, once not looking for the things of this world to bring lasting joy and pleasure, but to God who brings eternal peace and joy in Christ.

With this in mind we see that our mission begins with our lives, we are being sanctified for obedience. Discipline is essential in any mission, it is the means by which we accomplish the goal set before us. In the case of our lives as sojourners it is found in living our lives in pursuit of God and his righteousness. It is acting and speaking in ways that reflect the truth of God’s work in us. We aren’t being conformed any longer to the passion that rage in us, but rather are being conformed to the Image of Christ who calls us to preach the truth and love our neighbors. While the world tells you to do whatever feels right to you, or will make you happy, God calls us to seek the good of those around us above ourselves, the mission involves sacrifice for the purpose of Christ and the hope that others may come to faith and be transformed.

Our Lives won’t be easy

Lastly, Peter continually reminds us that the life we live as sojourners here reflects the fact that this is not our home. When you think of home, where ever that may be for you, it brings to mind images of safety, comfort, peace, maybe a bed to lay down at night, or the old cliché “home is where the heart is.” For us our true home awaits us, and as such we are reminded that in this life easy is not a guarantee, rather Peter will show us that because we don’t belong here we will be treated as such. We will suffer for doing the God honoring thing, we will be persecuted for speaking the truth in love. Suffering is not an exemption for a believer but rather the expectation, so we are encouraged all the more that our persecution leads other to see the truth of God’s goodness and love.

Peter informs us that when we are persecuted especially, that our response should mere that of Christ and not the world. Our response to the trials and tribulations of this world is to be a light and a glimpse in the nature of Christ, not a proof that we are in the end just as selfish and egotistical as the world. We don’t punch back harder; when we get punched; our lives should show that it was unjustified to be punched in the first place. We should not fall into shame, but our lives should reflect the glory of God in such a way that we can be continually proclaim the gospel or as the martyrs of old sing the psalms while being put to the torch.

 

Sam Storms and the Truth of Repentance

This past week I finished up a preaching series through the book of Ezra, some of you may have remembered the post I wrote earlier in the summer explaining the books importance and why I was preaching it, if not you can link to it here. As the Series drew to a conclusion the main focus of the final chapters is the need for believers to examine sin in their midst and deal with it in a state of true repentance. Which begged the questions what is true repentance. I was going to put together a long article about the aspects of repentance, however Sam Storms already posted one last week that captures exactly how Ezra deals with sin and our own response to it.

I wanted to give you the full copy here below for your own edification and discipline.

10 Things You Should Know about Repentance

August 14, 2017 | by: Sam Storms

The Reality of Death!

“Before my cancer was diagnosed, I knew that someday I would die, but I didn’t know when. After the diagnosis, I knew that someday I would die, but I didn’t know when. But now I knew it acutely. The problem wasn’t really a scientific one. The fact of death is unsettling. If there is no other way to live.” – Paul Kalanithi

 Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. Whoever believes in me, though he die, yet shall he live, and everyone who lives and believes in me shall never die. Do you believe this?”–Jesus

Death is probably one of the most uncomfortable subjects in modern America. It is something we would rather just not talk about, yet it is one of the most common aspects of human existence. Everyone who was born is destined to die and yet we spend most of  our life running from this very idea trying to block it out with entertainment, with work, with sports, some with “religious” and spiritual exercises and yet at the end of the day death comes for us all. This may seem like a grim opening but it is a reality that we all must at some point deal with in this life.

The opening quote that I put on this blog is actually from a book called When Breath Becomes Air.  It was written by a Christian neurosurgeon before he died in his mid-30s. In it he wrestles with the reality of the fact that he has his whole life ahead of him and yet it is all gone in one moment, one doctors visit, but at the same time nothing was taken from him that wasn’t already certain. He wasn’t promised a long life with lots of Kids with his wife. He was never guaranteed that finishing top of his field in medicine would produce the life changing research he hoped would occur. His life had changed and yet it in some way it didn’t.

I just finish reading it a few days before my 32nd birthday, probably not the most exciting time to read a book about death, but it did make me think back over Scripture and what Scripture continually reminds us of the reality of death; from the garden of Eden were they were cast out and death became a reality, through to the Gospels and the book of acts as brothers and sisters of Christ lay down their lives for the sake of Jesus. Death is a common occurrence in Scripture, for it is the result of the fall and the painstaking reality of sin around us and the need for a reconciled relationship with God and for restored creation.

However as we await this great day, death should remind us of the greatness of our God all the more. We are not promised tomorrow as Paul’s quote points out. We all know that tomorrow’s uncertain, all we know for certain is that there will come a points when everything we know and love in this life comes to an end, and yet more and more we don’t think about it. We ignore the idea that it is possible, we let it sit in the back of our minds unattended. However I challenge you to think about it more often than not, not in a manner that leads to sadness put in a manner that leads back to Christ. Each and every day the opportunity remains for us to deny ourselves and the goals of the flesh to pick up or cross to follow Him and make Him the center of all that we do, all that we will be, all that we may love. The reality of death is the true reality that we have life, and as a believer the truest life possible.

Therefore, as Christians we of all people should be most acutely aware of death and all the more the return of Christ. In the Gospels Jesus is continually reminding his disciples that the return is at hand, and they will write to the church to continually seek first the kingdom of heaven, to look for the return of Christ, like a  thief in the night unknown to us. The question though is will we be found seeking, will we be found working, living, breathing for Him or for the world around us. The reality of the return or of our own death on this earth is the reminder that we are not our own we are Christ’s, we are here with the purpose and mission to glorify the name of our God, to seek the welfare of those around us for the good of God, and to call men and women to faith.

We are all aware that our time is coming short whether we were given 30 years or 90 years on this earth is blinking of an eye In comparison to the totality of God’s great universe. What will you do with that time? What will you do with the gift that God has given you today? How will you use that time for the growth of the kingdom. Will you invest in your family for the glory of God? Will you take the truth of God to neighbors and friends who you put off for fear of what they may think?

We have one life to live, one day to die or the return of Christ to come, Let us be acutely aware of that reality and by being aware of it may we live it out.

Why Would you Preach That!

A little over a month ago I began preaching through the book of Ezra, that book right after Chronicles that deals with all the people coming back to the promise land, and rebuilding. No, not Nehemiah with the walls and all that really cool leadership lesson stuff. This book is about the depth of mercy God goes too in order to restore His people. In this little book we see the people broken down and defeated. They have acknowledged that they have sinned and God brings them home from exile. There is a lot to unpack in this book as we see them struggle with maintaining their convictions and following after God, yet God is long suffering and patient with his people, bringing prophets and men of the Word  again and again to point them back to the truth of Who God is and reminding them that God has a purpose for them.

Now I say all that to point to something that happened a week before we started preaching through the book. One of my members asked me honestly after reading the book what this has to do with the church and why we would study something like Ezra. Now I love my church and I totally see where he is coming from in that we don’t usually think about preaching through Old Testament texts like Ezra. We love texts on King David and even Nehemiah; I mean leadership lessons galore there. However there is just as much meat in the harder texts of the scriptures such as Ezra, the Minor Prophets (which I wrote on earlier in the year), Kings & Chronicles, Judges, Ruth or Esther.  These texts are often overlooked or simply relegated to Sunday School material, when they have some of the most amazing stories about the work of God in the lives of real people. In these lesser preached texts, we get to see God actually change things over the course of human history. This is where I explained the importance of Ezra.

For a church like mine in the midst of transition and revitalization we need to see the part of God where He is for his people. The story of Ezra shows a people who lost hope in their future. They didn’t see how God could us them anymore, even though He set them apart and had done great things in the past, for them it is simply past, but not with God. Ezra shows us that God works in long term swaths of history, what was once broken down and dying can be restored to new life through the preaching and teaching of the word of God (Ezra 5), through the faithful walking of His people under his word (Ezra 3,6,7) and through faithful obedience to the truth (Ezra 9-10). Ezra shows us that the Christian life is filled with ups and downs, but God remains and His people will be renewed. This is why Ezra was such an important book to be preached, not only for a church in transition or revitalization, but also for a church plant talking about what makes them a community of faith verses just a random group of people who meet and talk about God stuff, or even an established church who needs to be reminded of the Great work of God in the history of His people.

The lesser preached books, mostly it seems being Old Testament biblical narrative, are essential to our Christian faith because they are essential to the revealing of who God is and how God works. We can’t avoid them because they are hard and above all you can’t avoid them because they seem, irrelevant. If there is one thing we know to be true is that the word of God is never irrelevant and the narratives of the scriptures especially. God is the central figure in all of His word and the full revelation of Jesus begins in Genesis and is woven into the whole tapestry of scripture, to leave out large swaths of the story in preaching to our congregations is to miss out on the work of God and to deprive our people of seeing God’s work in the live so the saints through all of history. So For preachers; preach boldly the hard narratives and skipped over books, and for congregants; yearn for such preaching that shows the whole of God’s Word to be true and authoritative. Also pray for the Lord to open your own eyes to see his work through the lives of those who have gone before, through the struggles and victory of God’s people.

Studying Revelation (Free Study Guide)

This week I wanted to quickly draw your attention to another free eBook, because we all love books. This one is a helpful study guide on the book of Revelation by Vern Poythress.

If you have ever been interested in studying the book of Revelation in its historical and original context this is a fantastic little book. For all the fictional novels and hyper-dispensationalism that has taken over the fields of modern day eschatology, this little book helps us to see the original context and unpack how it would have been received and encouraging to the original audience, and as such how we too can find comfort in the truth of God.

The book can be found at the link below:

https://frame-poythress.org/new-resource-on-ebooks-page/

Here is a brief overview of the book of Revelation in regards to how Poythress will approach the book and help us to see its importance on the Christian life.

The Purpose of Revelation

Many people either fear the Book of Revelation or have an unhealthy interest in it. But God designed this book for a very different purpose. Revelation is meant to produce in you comfort, courage, hope, and praise. Do you believe that?

Look at the very beginning of Revelation. Rev. 1:3 says, “Blessed is the one who reads the words of this prophecy, and blessed are those who hear, and who keep what is written in it, for the time is near.” God knew that many people would feel timid about this book—that many would say to themselves, “I can’t understand it.” So he gave you special encouragement to read it. Make a point of reading it once or more during the next few months.

In the verse I just quoted (1:3) we already receive a hint about the contents of Revelation. God tells us to “keep what is written in it.” Revelation does not give us information just to tickle our fancy. We are meant to “keep” it, to take things to heart. We ought to be transformed by what we read, to become more faithful servants of Christ. The Book of Revelation is a very practical book.

Note also what it says in 1:1: “The Revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave him to show to his servants the things that must soon take place.” To whom is the Book of Revelation written? Not to PhDs, to experts, to prophecy fans, to a narrow inner circle of specialists. God writes it to “his servants”—the servants of Jesus Christ. If you are a follower of Christ, this book is for you. You can understand it, because God knows how to communicate to you. In addition, let me say the obvious. The Book of Revelation is a revelation, “the revelation of Jesus Christ” (1:1). “Revelation” means an unveiling, a disclosure, a display of who God is and what he promises to do. The Book is not a concealment, a puzzle, a riddle, as some people think. It is not a puzzle book but a picture book. Its message is so clear that a child can grasp it and be encouraged.

1. What is the purpose of Revelation?

2. In what way is it accessible to ordinary readers?

3. How might reading it be an encouragement?

 

Additional free books by Both Vern Poythress & John Fram can be found at their Website: https://frame-poythress.org/ebooks

Why Preaching Calendars?

Last night had a great dinner with friends of mine who also serve in the ministry, during dinner he asked me why do I do schedule my sermon series the way I do. Currently I tend to go from book to book interspersing random Psalms or five-week topical series between books.

The thing that you very quickly pick up on if you talk to any pastor is all have different ways of laying out sermon series. In that regard I would agree with many that there is no necessary right way to lay out a teaching calendar: whether it be year to year, three months, or monthly sermons. Some may ascribe to the notion that to even plan more than two weeks in advance is to deny the Holy Spirit’s work in your church or you may subscribe to the school that if we are in deep prayer with God trusting in his work and purposes planning our sermon series for the year will involve allowing the Holy Spirit to lead us into those choices. Today though here are three reasons I choose to plan out a year in advance

It allows us to see the Bigger picture

By this I mean putting together a sermon series beginning in September and working all the way around to the following August we can see the different ways they connect and how they will instruct the church throughout the year. Using 2016 to 2017 as an example we began in the book of Mark to instill with in our church an understanding of the Gospel message of who Jesus is and what He did.

In middle of this series we took a break and began to speak about the Great Commission for four weeks topically walking through our job as disciple making disciples, called to spread the faith building on Jesus’ own mission in the gospel of Mark calling people to repent and believe for the kingdom of God is near.

To close out the year we are going to the Old Testament in the book of Ezra. In this book we begin to see God renew his people as he brings them back to the city that they once called home. We see a rejuvenation of worship amongst the people that didn’t believe they had a purpose any longer. For a church in the midst of great transition in a community that is transforming around them this is a book that reminds us that God has a purpose for his people and that purpose is to worship him and to make his name great growing into the temple of the living God. So in laying out the year this way I hope that the church was able to see the continuity of the Bible as informs us in both the old and the New Testament of the work of God and what He is doing, while simultaneously showing how God builds his kingdom using his people.

Allows us to more clearly teach in every aspect

By knowing what I’m preaching on Sunday mornings for a year the elders are much more easily equipped to see where else what other aspects of God and the Scriptures nee d to be highlighted in our teaching. By knowing the books of the Bible that will be teaching as well as the topical series in between we are able to know where we should be leading our small groups as well as our Sunday school, children and youth ministries. By laying out Sunday morning so completely we can see the different theological ideas that may not be addressed in that given year. So maybe were able to put in a series in our Sunday schools on giving, personal relationships, marriage enrichment, or theological studies such as who is God, what is the role of Christ and culture, what is sanctification or justification.

In regard to small group it shows us what other books we may want to cover.  For example maybe our small group should study Nehemiah to see the back half of what takes place in the kingdom of God in Ezra or while preaching through the book of Mark a small group could say study the book of Matthew or John and see another angle to the gospel story. So Sunday preaching calendars simply allow us to better utilize our time in teaching to help explain the whole counsel of God.

Allows us to disciple intentional

Yearly preaching calendars can greatly enhance the ability to intentionally disciple, as spending time in a given book over the course of many months allows it to seep in and allows better questions and better connections to flow out of the text. It also allows our churches and people to really dive into a text each week before coming to worship. By allowing your church to know where you’re going and why you’re going there they are able to take a deeper ownership of their own personal walk coming into service on Sunday morning. It forces the pastor also to make sure that when studying the passage that they are answering the questions that come to mind while studying and praying that those are the same questions that have begun to germinate in the minds of those will sit in that service on Sunday morning.

 

I Hope this helps give you a glimpse into why some pastors choose to organize and do things the way they do. Probably this gives you a little insight into my mind and why we do things the way we do at Riverside. At the end of the day the goal is that we lead with conviction and passion for the word of God while not leaving out the work of the Holy Spirit. These yearly calendars are not put together on a whim but rather through much prayer and study. Seeking to know the people of the church as well as the direction the Lord is leading our church. It involves a lot of trust and faith in God and the Holy Spirit to lead us well in the midst of these decisions. In the end thought we know that His word does not return void. So whether you are one that listens to a sermon week to week or one who prepares it, may your heart be filled with joy at the hearing of the word of God and trust in the work of the Holy Spirit to change lives.

The Art of Turning (Review & Download)

This past week Kevin DeYoung Released a new book looking at the purpose and role of the conscience in a Christian’s life. This short book is available free to download at WTS bookstore. The link is provide below.

http://www.wtsbooks.com/art-turning-kevin-deyoung-9781911272212?pop=sample

First, this book is very much a primer on the ideas of the human conscience along with it’s biblical roots and function. At just 40 pages DeYoung unpacks why we should take the role of our conscience seriously, as it is both used by the Holy Spirit to convict us of sin as well as to give us assurance in the midst of trials.

Second, this book deals with the influences of the reformation and puritans as to how we often misunderstand and think about our conscience.  He shows us briefly and succinctly that these movements main point was never about a never ending source of introspection that leaves you in a constant state of gloom over sin and wretchedness. Rather both groups end was for us to sleep with a clear conscience by seeing our sin and our selves for what we were, but to also see our savior for who He is. While we have sinned greatly He has saved even greater. Our conscience should not be bogged down continual by our sin, but rather as we see sin in our lives we must turn them over in obedience, repent and walk in the grace of God.

Seriously if you have an hour to spare hop on over to WTS Bookstore and download this amazing book today, or order a few for some friends.

A Broken Down Faith

“Faith Without works is dead” what a convicting word from the book of James. This one verse in many places has caused great consternation, but this should not be the case. This one verse rather than being a stumbling block should be the encouragement that we need time and again to remember how we are called to live. In the book of James we are not being attacked for trusting in the grace of God or Christ for our full salvation, but rather being encouraged to test that faith by living out the Christian life. In seminary this was the primary area that I studied, applied theology or in normal terms ethics. It is the call to work out and apply the question of Peter “how then shall we now live.” If we know the truth of God, if we believe it with all of our hearts, soul and, mind than it must be worked out in our lives. Our faith is not a passive one but an active one; it is one that calls us to do; not to sit. It is a faith that calls us out of our enslavement to sin and death, to walk in holiness. Here are three quick reason and solution to why we don’t always “work” out our salvation.

We are Afraid

Deep down this is an underlying cause of much of why we don’t do what we been called to do, we are afraid. We’re afraid we may fail. We are afraid that somehow we will fail God’s moral standards and in so failing lose the hope of our salvation, but we know from Scripture that is not the case. Failure is just another opportunity to show that only God is perfect, and in that as well is another opportunity for us to see God transform our failures into his successes. We must not be afraid to fail but only to strive to live is Christ in faith in him. Fear of failure is one of the most paralyzing fears that grips the church, rather than trusting God to do the work our own knowledge of our inadequacy stops us from moving forward. This is especially true with sin. We are afraid that of what will happen when we try to walk in faith and stubble, or we are afraid to reach out to fellow brothers and sisters in Christ and seek help to overcome an ingrown sin, for fear of what they may think about us.

The greatest solution to fear is to truly trust in God. This may sound condescending but will we fear the call to live out the Christian life to fullest because of the thoughts and words of others. Will we allow fear of what might be rob us from the joy of what we know we have in Christ. We must understand that we are sinful beings who been saved by the grace of God, and it is by His saving grace that we can stand. To truly embrace the grace of God is to walk in it, and it is to be tested through faith.

We don’t know how

This this unfortunately feel like it’s become more and more the case as the church becomes more and more lax in the teaching of spiritual disciplines. What I mean by this is there has become shortage of teaching on how to live out the Christian life beyond simply telling people to read their Bibles and pray. To work out our faith with fear and trembling means to work it out in every aspect of life. It means that we teach our people what it means to live out the faith at their jobs, with their spouses, in how they discipline their children, in how they fellowship with their neighbors, and how they apply the Bible.

The solution to this involves the church rolling up its sleeves and doing the hard work of living life together. It’s involves the commitment of mature believers to walk alongside and disciple new converts in the faith. It involves those who have struggled, those who been comforted, and those who walk through the fires to pass on what they learned from those experiences of the work of God to others. We must seek to teach one another to walk in faith and it requires a commitment to walk together. If we want to know how to walk we must observe and be taught by others. Those who are in the midst of running the race well must desire to teach those who are coming behind them.

We Don’t want to

This is the part that really drives me crazy, because at the heart of many within the younger reform community this is actually why we do not live according to the Word of God. We’ve taken to the world and we enjoy what it has to offer us, and rather than living as God has called us to live we’ve adopted a view that God is cool with whatever we do as long as we rest in His grace. However as we see from Scripture this can’t be further from the truth. Choosing to live apart from Christ is to choose to not know Christ. This is an attitude where I sin because I want to and I don’t care what God has to say about it because he will forgive me anyways. This very idea is an anathema to the history of the reformed faith that many of these young believers even claim to uphold for you and never find this in the writings of Calvin nor of the Puritans, for of all men they saw that the glorious gift of God’s grace was not an excuse to sin but a motivation for righteousness.

The solution to is to simply turn back to God. It honestly is to repent and believe the truth of the Gospel that has called you out of darkness into the light. We do not celebrate in the things of the world but in the things of God. It involves the church standing true to the Gospel in the midst of a world that tells us that it’s archaic and out of step with the times. You must remember that your life is not your own; it has been crucified with Christ, and if you believe that it is you who are living and not Christ in you than you have lost sight of the reality of the gift that you claim to have. Therefore the only solution that remains is to repent and believe and walk in faith. For we have been saved by grace to Christ and in so to walk the Christian life.