Knowledge of The Holy One: What is God? Pt. 1

How can a man know God? How can that which was created comprehend its Creator? How can the finite grasp the Infinite?

While the answer to the aforementioned questions obviously direct us to our incapability of knowing God in His fullness, we have nevertheless been blessed with the ability know God (2 Pt 1:3) through His revealing of Himself in nature (Romans 1:19-20)), His written & spoken word (Hebrews 1:1, 2 Tim. 3:16), as well as primarily and expressly in His Son, Jesus Christ (John 14:6-11). God is not hiding from man; His works are visible, His word is discernable, & His Son was observable. With that being said, let us begin our pursuit of The Knowledge of the Holy One with awe and wonder in the incomprehensibility of what God is.

Question Four of the Westminster Shorter Catechism asks: What is God?

Answer: God is a Spirit, infinite, eternal, and unchangeable…

How can we, the physical, comprehend spirituality; the finite, infinity? Is it possible to understand eternity? And what of immutability, God’s inability to change? These are high and lofty considerations. Forgive my simple language as I attempt to illuminate The Light.  A.W. Tozer rightly implies our inability to explain or grasp these truths when he said, “The weightiest word in any language is its word for God.”[1] For when I have completed this post, there will still be more that could have been thought, said, or written; and so it will always be, even in eternity.

God is a Spirit: The spirituality of God is a clear statement of fact from the Lord Jesus Christ. John 4: 24 says, “God is spirit…” This simple statement is packed full of profundity leading the contemplator to awe-full worship! Steven Lawson provides three considerations concerning the spirituality of God: He is Immaterial, He is Invisible, & He is Infinite.[2]

God is Immaterial: Although God reveals Himself in his Holy Word using anthropomorphic language (the hands of God, the heart of God, the face of God, etc.) it is only to help our created minds, full of limitation, comprehend who The Holy One is, not what His physical being is like. God, a Spirit, is without spacial limitations. He has no height that can be measured. He has no mass from which one could weigh Him. He is without form, substance, or matter. Because God is immaterial, He is understandably not restricted by the material. He is above it, over it, through it, and intimately and intricately in control of it, as the Sovereign Creator of all matter. The physical realm, and all that is in it, is restricted by its created limitations but not so with the Immaterial, Eternal Spirit. He is without limitation, without restriction, and gave “birth” (if you will) to the material.  The Apostle Paul rightly unifies the material world under its Immaterial Creator in Ephesians 4:6 when he wrote of “…one God and Father of all, who is over all and through all and in all” (emphasis added).

God is Invisible: In essence, being without form or limited by the physical realm, God is invisible. We must, however, be careful “not to exclude God from the realm of the visible, but to regard him as the Lord of visibility, the Lord of light…[3] This means not that [God] can never be seen under any circumstances, but rather that, as Lord, he sovereignly chooses when, where, and to whom to make himself visible.”[4] Man’s eye, being a part of the created order, is limited to the physical, material realm and therefore must be divinely and supernaturally enabled to see Him who is Spirit, or He who is Spirit must put on visibility; hence, theophanies and the incarnation of Jesus Christ. Even in our greatest hour of discovery, with the development of machinery that can take mankind’s sight into the most intricate parts of the cell or into the deepest corners of the universe, still we observe creation; and the Creator is necessarily above and apart from His Creation as He is greater than that which was created. John 1:18, Colossians 1:15 & 1 Timothy 1:17 all confirm the invisibility of God as the inspired writers pen, “No one has ever seen God…the invisible God…the King of the ages, immortal, invisible, the only God…” for it is impossible for the material to observe the essence of the Immaterial, Invisible One.

God is Infinite: Lawson so profoundly states, “As a spirit-being, without a physical body, God has no boundaries or limits…free from any physical limitations…in no way limited by this time and space world and therefore is Infinite! There is no place that his being does not permeate with the fullness of all that He is.”[5] And still He is more! Consider this: Your desktop contains all that is knowable upon it; all that you do know and all that is yet to be learned; not by you alone but by all of humanity for all time. Anything that is knowable and everything that has been known and ever will be known resides upon that top. Surely, the sum of all such knowledge is incomprehensible and still God is more because even “knowledge” is finite, created, a substance or essence of creation and He is its Creator. He is More because He is above His creation and the Creator is necessarily, abundantly, and infinitely more than that which came from Him. Knowledge is limited and God is not. Knowledge has its boundaries, its end, its finality but God does not. All things are finite, all things had a beginning, and most will have an end but He did not and does not. He is Infinite; beyond comprehension. Wayne Grudem writes of The Infinite One in this way, “…he is infinite in that he is not subject to any of the limitations of humanity, or of creation in general.”[6] Consider, if you will, for a moment that even the concept of limitations falls under the created order, and therefore The Almighty towers above it. Naturally, or better yet, supernaturally, God’s infiniteness is the source of the “Omni’s” that will be dealt with in the future. As the Psalmist so aptly understood, “Great is our Lord…his understanding is beyond measure” (Psalm 147:5). Again, from the Psalmist the sobering words of our finiteness ring true, “Such knowledge is too wonderful for me; it is high; I cannot attain it” (Psalm 139:6). Amen, and amen.

God’s spirituality, immateriality, invisibility, and infinity are overwhelming truths that, as limited, finite parts of creation, we have a difficult time contemplating; let alone comprehending. Indeed, comprehension is out of our reach, both now as well as in eternity. As those who cannot comprehend, we must press on and make it our aim to apprehend that knowledge of the Holy One which is within our grasp while safeguarding against “the most wicked propensity of fallen humanity…to exchange the true God for one that we have made and can control.”[7] 

Let that which is beyond your comprehension usher you into worship, in Spirit and in Truth, as you apprehend that which He has revealed. After all, this is why you were created; to gaze upon His glory and enjoy him forever!
Citations:

[1] Tozer, AW: Knowledge of the Holy, pg. 5

[2] Lawson, Steven: The Attributes of God, DVD Session 3; Ligonier Ministries

[3] Frame, John: Systematic Theology, pg. 392

[4] Ibid, pg. 392

[5] Lawson, Steven: The Attributes of God, DVD Session 3; Ligonier Ministries

[6] Grudem, Wayne: Systematic Theology, pg. 167

[7] Sproul, RC: Truths We Confess Vol. 1, pg. 34

 

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Why Do We Need Creeds and Confessions?

The life and history of the church is a very interesting business, filled with a variety of personalities and opinions. This is especially true when it comes to the areas of theology and doctrine. This is why in a country that has always prided itself on individualism we have seen a massive growth of Denominationalism and “Non-denominationalism.” In each camp there is something that is rallied around as supreme, and rarely is it the reality of the gospel, but usually a secondary issue. However we may have come to these distinctive division they do exist and to some degree that is not bad as long as it is not hindering the advancement of the gospel and the truth of the work of Christ. For the most part this is where Creedal and confessional unity has found its niche and revitalization, it would seem, in the church landscape.

Now what is this Creedal and Confessional idea? This is the basic tenant that we as a church local (or believer individually) agree to and uphold a set of Christian teachings and interpretation of the scriptures that are binding on our life and practice. The earliest forms of our modern confessions were the Creeds of the church which originated as early as Paul with the writing of Philippians 2:6-11 and developed over time as the church grew and wrestled with the apostle’s teachings. Eventually there developed two majority creeds; the Apostles Creed and the Nicaean Creed, and after the reformation we say the growth of confessions; two predominant ones are: The Westminster Confession of Faith and the London Baptist Confession of Faith 1689. Today I want to take a moment and go over the benefits of Creeds and Confessions to the Modern Church.

They Bring Clarity

The Creeds and Confessions of the Faith helped to set the foundation for how we understand the scriptures. They in no way have replaced the scriptures, but rather in a succinct manner explained the basic tenants of the faith as reveled in the scriptures. Even to this day we still recite these statements in our churches. The Early creeds helped us to understand the scriptural teachings on the Trinity, gave clarity to the work and means of the Holy Spirit, and the importance of the communion of the saints. They helped us to know what we believed as Christians. In the midst of much confusion they helped new believers to see the basic teachings of the Scriptures.

They Connect Us to our History

The church where I currently pastor recites the Apostles creed following Communion to remind ourselves of the joyous banquet that awaits all the saints for all time that have trusted in the sacrificial death of Christ and await us at the Wedding Feast of the Lamb. The creeds and later the Confessions helped us to see that we are not alone in the Christian journey; our faith is not a 21st century invention but rather a historic and beautiful faith that has stood the test of time, through war, persecution, and even times of peace Christ has maintained and grown the church. The Confessions help us to see that. The early church creeds arose out times of great persecution, and the confessions of London and Westminster arose out of the freedoms granted following the painful persecution that plagued the English reformation. In these writing we are reminded that God has been at work building is church for two millennia, lead by the Spirit and His Word.

They Connect Us to One Another

In the Creeds and Confessions we see an underlying interpretation and understanding of the Gospel. As such they help us to bridge denominational lines, they help us to see where we have commonality and not only our difference. Our blog is a good example of this. We are a confessional blog, not a denominational one. We feature guys from a variety of backgrounds but we unify around two important (and yet distinct) confession: Westminster and London. The key distinction in each is their interpretation of baptism, but every other tenant is almost exactly the same with a few variations. As such our writers must agree with one of these two historic documents of the reformed Christian faith. These documents help us to see our great commonality around the truth of scripture rather than our one disagreement on the application of it.

They Point Us Back to the Scripture.

I saved this one for last, because it is the most important. The confessions are not an end in and of themselves and are never meant to be, they are a tool by which we see and go back to the scriptures. If someone calls themselves confessional and yet the bible is not where they have found these truths then they are far from it. To be confessional is to see the truths of these confessions in scripture not in the confessions. If I hold to salvation by Grace alone because the London Baptist Faith says it is biblical but have not examined the scriptures and seen it to be true, than I am relying solely on the word of man and this is the furthest thing from the point of the confessions and creeds. They help us to see the scriptures more clearly not to replace them. Unfortunately, many in the “confessional” camp at times seem to miss this point. When we ascribe to a confession of faith we must be ascribing to the fact that it most clearly represents the truth as revealed in Scripture, not because it is trendy or cool.