The Highest Art

turretinEvery now and then a quote hits me that explains what I feel about a certain passage of Scripture.  Upon reading the quote my spirit exclaims something like, “YES!  That’s exactly what ____________ (insert Bible verse) means!  I could feel what it was saying, so glad someone has put it into words for me.”

Below is such a quote.  Upon reading Romans 1:18-20 an interesting reflection could follow, which without careful guidance from good teaching, one could easily wander off into all sorts of error.  Francis Turretin (quote below and picture to the left) helps out a lot.

Romans 1:18-20 says, “For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who by their unrighteousness suppress the truth.  For what can be known about God is plain to them, because God has shown it to them.  For his invisible attributes, namely, his eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly perceived, ever since the creation of the world, in the things that have been made. So they are without excuse.”

Francis Turretin said:

“Not only do the heavens declare the glory of God, but every blade of grass and flower in the field, every pebble on the shore and every shell in the ocean proclaim not only his power and goodness, but also his manifold wisdom, so near each one that even by feeling, God can be found. Augustine says, “The prophetic voices excepted, the world itself by its own most regular mutability and mobility and the exquisitely beautiful appearance of all visible things, silently as it were proclaims both that it was made and could be made only by a God unspeakably and invisibly great, and unspeakably and invisibly beautiful….You may say perhaps that these things were so arranged by chance and by a fortuitous concourse of atoms. But I know not whether such an impious and absurd opinion is worthy of refutation, since these things denote not chance, but the highest art.”

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