Why I Left ‘The Reformed Pubcast’ – Grow Up, Settle Down, Keep Reforming

 

The Reformed Pubcast consists of two guys who host a podcast on Reformed theology and beer.  I love Reformed theology and I like beer too.  The podcast begins with the two hosts discussing the beer they’re drinking while recording the podcast and then it moves onto theology afterwards.  The Reformed Pubcast grew in it’s scope very fast, gained a large audience, even making the top podcast list on iTunes, and has a Facebook group which is currently about 5,000 strong.

I used to listen to this podcast. I used to be in the Facebook group – I am no longer.

Why?  Let me explain.

Being reformed theologically puts one a very strange position as a pastor.  I pastor just outside of North Tampa Bay, Florida and it is NOT a reformed culture at all.  It is very charismatic, arminian, man-centered, and seeker sensitive.  Naturally I am one of the few reformed guys in my area and if I meet another pastor/theologian near me who is reformed I become very excited because there seems to be so few near me.  So as you can imagine when I first heard of this podcast from a close friend I became very excited.  I began listening to it weekly, and became a member of the Facebook group too.  From my vantage point it looked like I had found like-minded community, something pastors don’t always have.

But as I continued listening to the podcast and interacting with the Facebook group one thing became increasingly apparent to me.  It seemed that these guys really do love Christ, that they love theology, and that they love the historic reformed heritage – but two things kept popping into my mind that put me off a bit.

First, an over-emphasis on alcohol.  I know Les and Tanner (the hosts) begin the show with discussing beer, how it is made, good beer, bad beer, and overall beer 101 but it became to be a central topic on the show and in the Facebook group.  This bothered me, so I stopped listening to the podcast and only participated in the Facebook group.  Now, those of you who know me know that I am not against beer.  I like beer, I drink beer.  BUT I am very against Christians celebrating alcohol in any sense, the abuse of alcohol in drunkenness, the insane amount of money people spend to buy it, and the horrendous impact it has had on many lives.  The Pubcast’s emphasis on beer is too much for my liking.  I don’t think it takes the consequences of alcohol seriously, or the struggle certain people have with it.  It borders on sin, and has crossed the line at times by celebrating/flaunting our Christian liberty before God and others.

Second, immaturity.  This is really the main issue at stake for me.  After listening to a few of the podcasts I noticed that there was immature coarse joking in it and when you over-emphasize the use of alcohol while cracking jokes and acting like adolescent boy you’ve simply gone too far to be helpful to anyone in the long term.  In my opinion, and it’s just that, the Pubcast is full of people who fall into the category of “Young, Restless, and Reformed.”  This is the “New Calvinism” of my generation, of which I am a part of.  This group is largely reformed in soteriology, but not in practice.  What I mean by that is they resemble their heroes like Mark Driscoll: reformed in doctrine while entrenched in modern day hip culture.

I once was proud to call myself part of the YRR (Young, Restless, & Reformed) group and interestingly enough during the days I was proud to use and promote that label I also was very keen in flaunting my use of Christian liberty before both the Church and the World.  Of course I didn’t think I was doing this at the time (hindsight is always 20/20 right?) but that is exactly what I was doing.  I was in my mid 20’s, I thought we YRR’s were the cutting edge of Christianity, the right ones, who not only had right doctrine but trendy living and solid reformed rap as well.  Why couldn’t everyone else see that this was the way to live the Christian life?  Why couldn’t they see that this is the way to reach the lost, to show them that they could be cool AND have Jesus as well?  During this time in my life I slowly began to think that we YRR’s had arrived.  We hadn’t,

Please don’t hear me saying 100% of the Reformed Pubcast Members fall into this category, they don’t.  I was squarely in the YRR at one time in my life and I can now spot those who are in similar trajectories easier because of my mistakes.  Not all that I did during those days was bad, but what I couldn’t see then and what I can see clearly now is that I wasn’t really trying to reach the lost around me, or impact the world, or even show the Church and the World how to live the Christian life.  What I was doing was being very selfish and masking it like it was the godly thing to do.  That was sin, and I have repented for such non-sense.

Now back to the Pubcast.  The self absorption and flaunting of my Christian liberty I got caught up with during my mid-20’s is by and large what I see plaguing the members of the ‘Reformed Pubcast.’  For this reason I have left the group.  Why?  Because though I am solidly within the reformed camp, I am no longer young or restless.  Should the other members of the pub cast leave as well?  Sure maybe, that’s for each of them to decide.  What they should do is grow up from boys to men and that is the point of why I’m writing this.

The point of writing this post is that the reformed young people of today (who are represented in the Pubcast) need to be called out to not only reform their doctrine in line with Scripture, but reform their lives as well.  What does this look like?  Simple.  It looks like boys growing into men, and owning the call to sacrificially give up ourselves in Christ-like obedience to others.  When we come to the end of ourselves, we find the beginning of life in Christ.

I leave you with John MacArthur’s words of advice to the YRR crowd: “Grow up, settle down, keep reforming.”

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28 thoughts on “Why I Left ‘The Reformed Pubcast’ – Grow Up, Settle Down, Keep Reforming

  1. Bummer. Publican, this IS controversial, and sadly, there’s very little here to which I would agree. Obviously, we have so much in common, including our mutual faith. So, I will just respond without horns… as a brother, in love, respect, and humility as much as I can possibly muster…

    1. Your first point is an opinion, and one that is not backed in any way by scripture… // “BUT I am very against Christians celebrating alcohol in any sense” // Why are you against celebrating a gift that the Lord gives? The Bible says, “Go, eat your food with gladness, and drink your wine with a joyful heart, for God has already approved what you do.” Ecc 9:7… and “spend the money for whatever you desire—oxen or sheep or wine or strong drink, whatever your appetite craves. And you shall eat there before the LORD your God and rejoice you and your household.” Deuteronomy 14:26.

    In the two passages, God connects alcohol with rejoicing. If your reformed brothers rejoice in the Lord with their drinks, why can’t you get behind that? I think you may be influenced by the voice of the weaker brother, crying out about his conscience. But the conscience of a brother is to be respected, not used as a weapon to condemn. In like manner, the liberty of a brother is to be used for rejoicing in Christ, not used as a weapon to flaunt, or cause anyone to stumble. Drinking a beer in public does not cause anyone to stumble. So it would follow that a CLOSED Facebook group of like-minded believers is certainly not causing anyone to stumble, nor could you possibly accuse them of “flaunting” their liberty. The only way I could see this happening is if the community and the podcast was happening during corporate worship. Which of course, it is not.

    2. Your second point centers around the accusation of immaturity, and coarse-joking in particular. // “I noticed that there was immature coarse joking in it” // But you don’t give any examples, so it’s hard to defend. I’ve listened to every episode, and I’ve had no problem whatsoever letting my kids listen along with me. I would consider it family-friendly (PG-rated) content. I would be curious as to what you are referring to regarding course-joking?

    3. In my opinion, calling members of the Reformed Pubcast community “boys”, “immature”, “YRR”, and “self-absorbed”… sounds proud and overly-righteous, bro. You confess that not 100% of the members fall into this category, but since you don’t call out any specific examples, all the reader hears, despite your caveat, is a public rebuke and denunciation of the entire group. A group which, I would remind you is filled with pastors, elders, deacons, and other leaders in the church who love Christ and His word just as much as yourself. I would argue, your charge, and your rebuke are unfounded and unnecessarily divisive. 😦 The group has very mature and Godly moderators who do a good job of policing the posts and comments. They ensure that the holiness, godliness, and love are at the center of all that is discussed.

    Finally, I would just say that if an online community or a podcast that openly celebrates alcohol, pop-culture, the Bible, and reformed theology isn’t your cup of tea, then fine. Go start your own reformed group, or join an existing one where holiness = prohibition, liberty = secrecy, and maturity = austerity. As for me, I will have a beer, rejoice, laugh, and enjoy the precious freedom Christ has purchased for me on the cross.

    Love you in the Lord, Publican! I look forward to reading your response. Also, I am very open to being privately rebuked for any sin you see me participating in on any online forum.

    P.S. – While I respect John MacArthur for his contributions to the church in the field of exegesis, his gross twisting of the text regarding alcohol (grape juice) and eschatology (premil dispensationalism), really adds a grain of salt to anything that he says.

  2. This article is very much a straw man. It makes me wonder if you really spent much time in the facebook group at all. There are very few Driscoll fans in ythe group. The men of faith I see most looked up to are the Sprouls, Pipers, and James Whites.

    Secondly beer is a minor topic . I challenge you to go to the page and count the posts on beer. I bet it is less than 50%. And it is a closed group so how is that flaunting alcohol?

  3. What 06dayz said. Exactly.

    “…[alcohol] became to be a central topic on the show and in the Facebook group.”

    Ermm, yes. It’s the Reformed PUBcast. A podcast devoted to discussing Reformed Theology and Beer. What did you expect? Are you looking for a podcast that only discusses Reformed Theology? There are plenty out there. To criticize them for talking too much about beer and not enough about Jesus is like criticizing Lecrae for talking more about [anything] than Jesus. But you don’t seem to criticize your favorite rapper that way…hmmm.

    On the immaturity:

    As an admin of the Pub (FB group) I see a lot that goes on. While there is immaturity (as will happen with thousands of members ranging in age) there is even more maturity and discipleship going on than you apparently care to admit – which makes me wonder if you stuck around long enough to be able to form a proper opinion? We’ve (the pub) banded together to raise money to pay for medical bills for a sick brother, helped a campus minister raise funds, there has even spawned a Pub Prayer group solely devoted to lifting up our brothers and sisters.

    “The self absorption and flaunting of my Christian liberty I got caught up with during my mid-20’s is by and large what I see plaguing the members of the ‘Reformed Pubcast.’”

    Flaunting of Christian Liberty. In a closed group. That no one can see unless they’re a part of it. Where’s the flaunting?

    Guess the Pub wasn’t the place for you. Perhaps the next time you’re a part of a group, you could take up any issues with the folks in charge. Instead of calling everyone out on false charges. No edification going on here. Cheers.

    1. 6dayz, Brandon, and Dustin,

      Thanks for commenting on this, I appreciate you all taking time to read what I said in my post.

      Im out of town so I’ll respond early next week longer, but for now I’ll just note one thing. I don’t think any of you read my post objectively for what was really present in it. Closed group or not there are trends within your group that I find unedifying and unwise. Clearly alcohol isn’t sinful but to make it a major focus of your lives is unhealthy for any Christian.

      More later….

      1. “Clearly alcohol isn’t sinful but to make it a major focus of your lives is unhealthy for any Christian.”

        How are we making it a major focus of our lives? The Pub is not our life, it’s a place where we go to discuss…beer and theology. If you walk into a chess club, would you criticize them for spending so much time discussing and playing chess?

  4. I’ve seen this behavior before, classic projection.

    It sounds like you Adam are having issues making things a focus. You want everything to be so black and white, its easier that way right ? This is why you are actually the one with the obsession over alcohol. You are the one with the obsession over immaturity. Its easy to tell that If you are this focused on detailing and documenting a facebook group that people engage in their spare time. maybe you should examine what it is your doing with your life.

    Couldn’t you better use the time you charinge other Christians in the areas of liberty to seek the lost, disciple, and prepare sermons for your church? You could be examining the arguments of rank heretics and atheists. Your blog posts are basically a more reformed version of the “Checklist Christianity” I see in the moralistic deistic evangelicalism of the west. I urge you to stop trying to make other people “better Christians” (which is an oxymoron) and point to Christ.

  5. You do a great injustice to the members of the Reformed Pub and its members. Yes we joke around alot, we talk about beer and alcohol. We also make it clear that no one advocates abuse of substances, any substances.
    And when alcohol is discussed, its usually about the craft and the quality and never the quantity.
    And why do we do it? Not that you ever made much effort to find out or comment on things you disagreed with, which was encouraged- infact no one, not even the group leaders that you throw a blanket condemnation at by name, have any idea who you are. There are those who dont think you ever joined the group in the first place. But back to the why of it. Because, we enjoy talking about other things than detailed theological discussion about everything from Biblical proof regarding the old Earth vs new Earth debate to infant baptism. Which we do daily. Do you have any idea how hostile the group would become, or any group, when you have representatives from every major and minor reformed group there is, discussing things in open forum. No of course not, Because you made no contribution to the group. And when we discuss these things, surprise, we often need a pressure release in the form of humor or a simple subject change.
    The only thing you did was leave and start your own, gaining much attention at the expense of people who welcomed you into the group as a brother in Christ.

    You have MISREPRESENTED a large group of Christians and cast JUDGEMENTS based on opinion. We are made up of Pastors, students, professors, retirees, home-makers blue and white-collar workers, young and old. All of whom would have treated you as a equal ( unless that is your issue- simply being a single voice in a large crowd.) You paint this group as the YRR? If you took a tenth of the pastors in the group and stood their experience against your own, you would be ashamed.

    I realize you might expect a more respectful tone, but for the point of illustration, you get the same respect you gave. And if you thought being a minister bought you respect, then you should have shown it to the ministers in the group.

    P. Claus, Proud and grateful member of the Reformed Pub.

  6. Just curious: don’t you have a presbytery with other reformed pastors for fellowship? I’ve never heard this podcast, so I know nothing about it. And yes, I know that other pastors are not always the best company. I have found many to be insecure and distant. But feel free to send me a friend request on FB and I’ll be happy to accept it.

  7. As a member of the Pub, I must say that I agree with you, Adam. At least, on many things. You seem to generalize in several of your points, which I find distasteful. Nonetheless, I grasped your point. I have seen similar trends. Although, I have also seen things in the Pub that don’t fit your accusations. I honestly do not like associating myself with words such as “reformed” or “Calvinist.” The reason is primarily because of the large number of people claiming those titles are often very arrogant. When I would speak with other Christians and they found out I was “Calvinist,” anything I had to say would be disregarded. In my opinion, it is because of the culture that developed around those terms in recent years, much like you described. I have since decided to no longer describe myself (or my theology) in those terms. In doing so, I have had many more fruitful conversations with Christians holding opposing beliefs…which would not have happened had I said, “oh, by the way, I’m a Calvinist.” In saying all those things, I enjoy being a part of the Pub simply to pose questions, engage in friendly debate from time to time, and voice my opinions in an environment that is (at times) free of harsh conflict. If I see something I don’t like, I simply ignore it. I hope my words do not lead folk in the Pub to have me expelled. I do wish to remain a part of it simply for the reasons mentioned before. Lastly, as far as the beer is concerned, I do enjoy one from time to time. However, I do agree with you about constant talking about it. Sure, less than half of the posts are about beer. But from time to time I will see Picts of beer and some comment about it. Similarly are Picts of personal libraries. Both of which appear to come from a place of pride and is not simply sharing details about one’s life. Furthermore, Christian liberty is not defined by the ability to drink or smoke or whatever. It is the ability to live a life of holiness and integrity by the Spirit’s power. So I don’t perceive the alleged flaunting to be a flaunting of Christian liberty, but simply flaunting or boasting. The wise man doesn’t boast in those things- He boasts only in that he knows the Lord who practices steadfast love, righteousness, and justice in all the earth. The wise man delights in the delights of God. God made good drink, and art, and music, and all those things are worth discussing. However, I agree that they should not be a primary focus. Even theological discussion should not be of primary discussion. Holiness and the pursuit of God is to be of primary discussion. “Reformed” and “Calvinist” thinkers, in my opinion, are often guilty of lofty talk. The cherished theology is their secret knowledge, and those who disagree are not worthy of inclusion and are subject to harsh criticism that is, at times, borderline hatred. Acting in that way (believing in reformed theology as though it’s a secret knowledge one must have to really be in the faith) is nothing less than Gnosticism. I say all these things in sincerity and love, wishing to see similar things you long for: holiness- encouragement- love- etc. prospering among Christians, not only in the Pub, but over all the earth. As a reminder to everyone, myself included, though we may have knowledge and power and all possessions of the earth, we are nothing if we do not know the love of God.

  8. As a member of the Pub, I must say that I agree with you, Adam. At least, on many things. You seem to generalize in several of your points, which I find distasteful. Nonetheless, I grasped your point. I have seen similar trends. Although, I have also seen things in the Pub that don’t fit your accusations. I honestly do not like associating myself with words such as “reformed” or “Calvinist.” The reason is primarily because of the large number of people claiming those titles are often very arrogant. When I would speak with other Chrisians and they found out I was “Calvinist,” anything I had to say would be disregarded. In my opinion, it is because of the culture that developed around those terms in recent years, much like you described. I have since decided to no longer describe myself (or my theology) in those terms. In doing so, I have had many more fruitful conversations with Christians holding opposing beliefs…which would not have happened had I said, “oh, by the way, I’m a Calvinist.” In saying all those things, I enjoy being a part of the Pub simply to pose questions, engage in friendly debate from time to time, and voice my opinions in an environment that is (at times) free of harsh conflict. If I see something I don’t like, I simply ignore it. I hope my words do not lead folk in the Pub to have me expelled. I do wish to remain a part of it simply for the reasons mentioned before. Lastly, as far as the beer is concerned, I do enjoy one from time to time. However, I do agree with you about constant talking about it. Sure, less than half of the posts are about beer. But from time to time I will see Picts of beer and some comment about it. Similarly are Picts of personal libraries. Both of which appear to come from a place of pride and is not simply sharing details about one’s life. Furthermore, Christian liberty is not defined by the ability to drink or smoke or whatever. It is the ability to live a life of holiness and integrity by the Spirit’s power. So I don’t perceive the alleged flaunting to be a flaunting of Christian liberty, but simply flaunting or boasting. The wise man doesn’t boast in those things- He boasts only in that he knows the Lord who practices steadfast love, righteousness, and justice in all the earth. The wise man delights in the delights of God. God made good drink, and art, and music, and all those things are worth discussing. However, I agree that they should not be a primary focus. Even theological discussion should not be of primary discussion. Holiness and the pursuit of God is to be of primary discussion. “Reformed” and “Calvinist” thinkers, in my opinion, are often guilty of lofty talk. The cherished theology is their secret knowledge, and those who disagree are not worthy of inclusion and are subject to harsh criticism that is, at times, borderline hatred. Acting in that way (believing in reformed theology as though it’s a secret knowledge one must have to really be in the faith) is nothing less than Gnosticism. I say all these things in sincerity and love, wishing to see similar things you long for: holiness- encouragement- love- etc. prospering among Christians, not only in the Pub, but over all the earth. As a reminder to everyone, myself included, though we may have knowledge and power and all possessions of the earth, we are nothing if we do not know the love of God.

  9. Responding to these comments now on my blog, post will be going up soon. Thank you for everyone who commented, I do appreciate you reading what I have to say.

  10. Very good post. I think you outlined your concerns well. I’m sorry that what I see in this thread, is that your concerns haven’t been maturely received (by all, at least) within the Pub.

  11. I have to say to me this post seems spot on the money. Pastoring I have learned how absolutely destructive not to mention unnecessary the flaunting of liberty is, and it does seem to be a mark of the YRR crowd.

  12. Good Stuff,
    Ignore the complainers who say you are strawmanning and the like. Take it from a guy who was once where you once were yourself. You’re spot on the money. The obsession with drinking is particularly problematic, and is really the modern equivalent to the paganism that Paul told the Corinthians to abandon in 1 Cor. 8-10. I wonder if any of the pubcast fans ever had to deal with alcoholism in their lives, or comfort a grieving husband who is married to a drunken wife he loves, or families who have had children taken away from them in a drunk driving accident. Those experience tend to bring about a soberness in these matters.

  13. Great article. All the more confirmed to me the correctness of my decision to totally abstain since conversion 40 years ago. Looks like some people are always looking for an excuse to get a buzz.

    But hey, Jesus made wine right? He also made marijuana. Excuse me, gotta run. I have a meeting at the Reformed Bongcast. Wait, you have a problem with my marijuana? You poor, to be pitied weaker brother.

    Can’t wait to see how all the theological beer pubbers are going to deal with the theological cannabis pubbers.

  14. Thanks for the post, Adam. As a young 25 year old Christian only 12 years into Christianity but 4 years into my walk as a reformed believer, I agree with your points. Although like you said, it can’t be said of every member if the group, I definitely recognize the same patterns. I found it a burden to try and overlook when I continuously noticed it. I think this is affirmation enough for myself to take a step aside from the group and really evaluate what it is I’m wanting from a community like that.

    On a side note, I grew up and was saved in Florida (Ft.Lauderdale). I never knew anything existed beyond the charismatic arminian theology that floods that region. I wish I could have learned more about the BIBLE while I was out there instead of just “The Spirit” and “feeling” what God is doing. Keep teaching the Word and I thank you for standing up a reformed church in a place that I very well know needs all the solid Bible teaching it can get. God bless.

  15. I recently left the Facebook group, but am continuing the podcast.

    I see much more immaturity in the Facebook group than in the podcast. And I see that some have called you out for not being an agent of change, adding maturity to the group. I tried that tactic for a month or two. It doesn’t work when you are speaking with a YRR person who already has all the answers that they need. Of course, that is a lack of humility that you have recognized as you have progressed. But just try to convince a YRR Christian that they would do well to listen to the voice of experience! Unless you are a published pastor who speaks routinely at conferences. Then try to recognize the idolatry in the YRR refusal to listen to the viewpoints of caring Christians who are trying to speak directly to them. Yes, there are splinters and logs on both sides. And I don’t claim to be without sin here myself.

    Then there’s the moderation of the group. I have had more than one statement removed. Always without warning, Never with any citation. Is it too much to expect a moderatior to comment the reason another person’s comment was removed? A problem pub member doesn’t need every removal to be cited. They need to be uninvited from the pub! Why am I mentioning this at all? The Pub is, at the foundation, a CHRISTIAN group. Not everybody in there consumes alcohol. That’s OK. There are a few Catholic members, probably some athiest lurkers, that’s OK also. But the overarching reason for the pub is for Christians to converse. I have shared some of my struggles in there, requesting prayer, only to see the posts vanish into thin air. And no, I was not describing heinous sins in graphic detail. I also challenged a comment by another member. I presented my viewpoint and provided scripture, then invited him to respond in kind. My comment was removed with no reason given and I complained in the same thread. And you know what? My “oppenent” agreed with ME that the discussion was completely appropriate.

    I have been a Christian now for eleven years. Ten of those as a Reformed Christian. I remember before we had YRR, we had TR (Totally Reformed). When I was a TR, I was shopping around to find a Geneva Bible, had a man crush on John Piper and thought I had all of the answers. I was arrogant, respected by many of my TR peers and overly argumentative with ofher Christians over matters that we ultimately agreed on, but for slight variations in understanding. I repented and continue to repent of my pride. The most vocal members of the Facebook group remind me of me a decade ago. What did I lack at that time? Humility and discipleship. Did I think I had both at the time? You bet I did. What showed me my desperate need? God humbled me mightily. Then he put a Godly man in my path to disciple me. God is known for smashing idols. He is a fool who makes an idol of himself.

    I am listening to my first podcast since I left the Facebook group right now. I have lost some of the interactiveness that I had before, but not a whole lot really. My FB wall, or timeline, or whatever, is much more useful. Will I continue to listen? It’s just another podcast now. As long as it is informative and entertaining, I probably will. In fact, after seperating the podcast from the Facebook group, my experience is enhanced.

    1. Thanks for your comment Doug. I think too many people experience what you and I have from the YRR community.

      Glad God is chasing you down, praise Him!

  16. While I haven’t “officially” left the RP as a subscriber (I listen only–I don’t do Facebook), I feel lead as I’ve been growing in holiness, the call to forsake alcohol. The scripture that really got me was 1 Peter 4:1-2. Knowing the will of God is for my sanctification as well as for sobriety, and feeling called to enter into a gospel heralding ministry (aka evangelism & street preaching), I believe it would be for my benefit and for God’s glory to forsake drinking. I really enjoy having a drink but I feel the benefits of abstinence from alcohol in obedience to the Spirit far outweigh the temporal pleasures of feeding the flesh. And I feel as I grow in holiness that to hold onto this God given pleasure (Ecclesiastes) in moderation, to have alcohol on a pedestal in my life is just selfish and immature.

    But all that aside, I really wanted to applaud some points Powers made in his article. The last episode I heard on the RP was Episode 79. Hearing them play the question game and joking coarsely about things Shia LaBeouf and James Franco had said has just made me ashamed to be associated with this. Christians are to be separate from the world and set apart unto holiness and obedience. The things men esteem are an abomination to the Lord. I was sickened to hear the things discussed in this episode (particularly the James Franco stuff). This kind of thinking shouldn’t be associated with a follower of Christ (Col 3:2). I don’t listen to this show to let worldly smut pollute my mind, but if that’s the direction the RP is going,then I don’t think I’ll be subscribed for much longer.

    If anyone has good recommendations for evangelism and witnessing podcasts they can recommend me, please tweet me the name. God bless!

  17. Keep up the good work, Adam. You are spot-on in everything that you say. Your gracious responses to flak from the Reformed Pub crew suggest a vital, authentic, and lively Christianity. God bless you, brother!

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